Planning for an Emergency

In recent days and weeks we have seen storms and tornados that result in evacuations for homeowners and consequently their pets.  There is an organization in Colorado, readycolorado.com, that has timely information about what to do if you are being evacuated from your home.  There is much you can do preemptively to be ready for such an event.  I urge you to go to the website and review their suggestions and decide what is best for you and your situation.  Those of us who live in Colorado are familiar with forest fire emergencies and understand that often, time is of the essence.  For those of you in other states, I’m sure your state has an organization like this one.  If not there is the Department of Homeland Security Pet Preparedness (www.ready.gov/america/getakit/pets.html) or the American Red Cross that also have pertinent information.

I suggest you put together a ‘to go’ kit for your dog(s) that is available on short notice.  Perhaps, if you enjoy camping you might already have such a kit accumulated and is available to you in the event of an emergency.  This kit should include:  +pet food and water for 3 days; + can opener/spoons bowls; + treats; + medications;  + copies of vaccination records; + collars/harnesses with tags and/or microchip info, leashes; + photos of you with your pets; + current sticker on house window with pet list for fire/emergency personnel; + pet first aid kit; + bedding; + toys; + leather gloves and towels; + grooming supplies; + paper towels, plastic trash bags, spray cleaner/disinfectant; + alcohol based hand sanitizer; + list of important animal emergency contacts – animal control, animal shelter, veterinarians, etc.

If you have cats you will probably add cat litter and a litter pan.  If you have other pets, their needs will be a consideration as well.

As always – safety first.  Of course, we all hope we never have to use the kit but in the event of extreme weather or fire, we need to do all we can to keep our pets safe.

 

#6 – Frustration Barking

We all know what this barking is, don’t we?  It’s our neighbor’s dog.  The sound is an endless round of barking, over and over again.  Frustrated dogs also show other signs of repetitive behaviors such as digging, licking, chewing, etc.  But the barking gets the attention of the neighbors and perhaps eventually the authorities.  We… Continue Reading

#5 – Guard Barking – your reactive dog

Guard barking includes growling and because it includes growling people often interpret this as aggression.  Aggression can be displayed in many different ways but not usually barking.  Guard barking shows itself when a dog is defending himself or something that belongs to him.  This defensiveness is a result of insecurity, stress and fear.  The sound… Continue Reading

#4 – Fear Barking

We are all afraid of something.  And like us, a dog’s fear range can be from merely concerned to full panic.  Dog’s who cannot cope with their fear will bark  This bark is high pitched and comes in a series of hysterical barks with a high probability of howling.  The dog will also be producing… Continue Reading

#3 – Warning Bark

Owners say they appreciate the warning bark because it is useful.  It’s an early warning system that something may be amiss.  The sound is generally a short, “woof” which indicates “danger” as perceived by the dog.  The problem with the warning bark is that owners may ignore it and the dog continues to warn of… Continue Reading

#2 – Excitement barking

As promised I am giving you some helpful hints about excitement barking that occurs in the car or when guests arrive and stress barking. Barking in the car is sometimes encouraged because we often take our dogs to great places in the car – dog park, the beach, etc.  Conversely, many dogs hate the car… Continue Reading

#1 – Excitement Barking

Generally this barking is a result of extreme happiness or the anticipation that something wonderful is about to happen.  This bark is a constant high frequency sound accompanied by jumping, spinning, whining or other vocalization.  An example is the situation where your dog sees that you are getting ready to take him outside for a… Continue Reading

Leash Manners – Day #5

This Day 5 post is a technique developed by Seattle trainer and behaviorist, Grisha Stewart.  Actually she has more then one method but I’m going to concentrate on the technique she calls “Silky Leash”.  It is quite different from the other methods discussed over the last few days and I think you will find it… Continue Reading

Leash Manners – Day #4

Today’s anti-pulling technique comes from John Rogerson, author of The Dog Vinci Code.  I recommend the book, in fact, I believe I gushed about John Rogerson weeks ago.  His technique for stopping a dog from pulling is unique and designed for dogs who pull so hard they can pull you over.  First, if you do… Continue Reading